Nerd Stuff

archaeologicalnews:

Charred grains of barley, millet and wheat deposited nearly 5,000 years ago at campsites in the high plains of Kazakhstan show that nomadic sheepherders played a surprisingly important role in the early spread of domesticated crops throughout a mountainous east-west corridor along the historic…

archaeologicalnews:

A number of Medieval wooden barrels have been uncovered in Denmark, revealing their less- than-glamorous contents.

Originally built to transport goods and store fish, the barrels were converted into latrines — still filled with their original contents.

"We are talking about 700-year-old…

archaeologicalnews:

The remains of a 1,500-year-old monastery with intact mosaics covering the floor have been uneartehed in southern Israel, the Israel Antiquities Authority announced Tuesday (April 1).

The Byzantine complex, which was discovered near Hura, a Bedouin village in the northern Negev Desert,…

Ancient Indian mound may become national landmark

archaeologicalnews:

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It’s the only Indian burial mound in urban Broward to have survived development. And now, nearly 1,000 years after it was created, it stands to be listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

As many as 100 Tequesta Indians are thought to be buried on the patch of land in what is now Pompano Beach.

"The Tequesta treated this as a special place," said Bob Carr, of the Archaeological and Historical Conservancy, Inc., which studied the mound. "It was a deliberate form of architecture to create a place for the dead."

Wedged into Indian Mound Park, in a quiet area east of the Intracoastal Waterway, the oval-shaped, 100-foot-wide mound has long been considered an important historical site. Read more.

"Spectacular" gold Anglo-Saxon ring found by detectorist to go on show in Essex

archaeologicalnews:

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Tony Carter, a resident of Uttlesford, found the 1,400-year-old jewel - dubbed The North-Essex Ring - in 2011, describing it as the highlight of his 41 years in metal detecting.

It is highly decorated with Anglo-Saxon motifs. Birds, an interlaced ornament, an engraving of a belted human figure with a cross, a bird of prey and a range of pagan Anglo-Saxon and Christian symbols all adorn its sphere.

“The museum has received an unprecedented level of support to acquire it,” said Tony Watson, the Chairman of the Saffron Walden Museum Society, thanking benefactors including the V&A Purchase Grant Fund and the Art Fund, whose Treasure Plus initiative has allowed the museum to install a permanent showcase for the ring. Read more.

sarena-babaroga:

Story of a dress - Lyrota - Persephone Dress

‘Hidden Architecture’ of 1,000-Year-Old Village Discovered in New Mexico

archaeologicalnews:

For more than 40 years, archaeologists have been coaxing what they could from the traces of an ancient Puebloan settlement in New Mexico they call Blue J.

Buried under a thousand years’ worth of eroded stone and wind-blown sand, Blue J has intrigued experts with what little it has revealed: the outlines of nearly 60 households, situated around a series of open plazas, the masonry and building styles dating their construction to the 11th century.

Almost entirely unexcavated, the settlement sits just 70 kilometers south of Chaco Canyon — the nexus of Ancestral Pueblo culture — and was built during the heyday of Chaco’s widest influence. Read more.

11 ancient burial boxes recovered in Israel

archaeologicalnews:

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The Israeli Antiquities Authority unveiled 11 ancient burial boxes Monday that were recovered by the Israeli Police early Friday morning.

Officials say the boxes are 2,000 years old. Some are engraved with designs and even names, giving clues to their origin and contents. The boxes contain bone fragments and remnants of what experts say is pottery buried with the deceased.

The authority says the boxes were recovered last Friday in Jerusalem when police observed a suspicious nighttime transaction involving two cars, four individuals and the 11 boxes. Once police realized the boxes were of archaeological significance, they alerted the Antiquities Authority. It is not yet clear how the suspects got hold of the boxes. Read more.

Did the pharaohs know hieroglyphics? - Polish Egyptologist explains

archaeologicalnews:

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Could all the pharaohs read and write? Only 1-3 percent of the inhabitants of ancient Egypt mastered this exceptionally difficult art. Evidence of literacy of the rulers of Egypt are perhaps not numerous, but clear, argues Filip Taterka, Egyptologist, a doctoral student at the Institute of Prehistory, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań.

In ancient Egypt, there were several types of handwriting. Currently, the best known are classical hieroglyphics, carved in stone on the walls of temples and tombs.

"For administrative documents and literary texts, ancient Egiptians used mainly hieratic, which was a simplified form of writing used since the Old Kingdom, the time of the builders of the pyramids in the third millennium BC. In the middle of the first millennium BC, even more simplified demotic appeared" - explained Taterka. Read more.

wilwheaton:

AHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAaaaaa
*deep breath*
HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA
*pant*
*pant*
No, but seriously, Creationists, Cosmos is about science, so your bullshit can go somewhere else where fairy tales are taught.

wilwheaton:

AHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAaaaaa

*deep breath*

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

*pant*

*pant*

No, but seriously, Creationists, Cosmos is about science, so your bullshit can go somewhere else where fairy tales are taught.