Nerd Stuff
Ancient Egyptian tomb lost for decades rediscovered in Luxor

archaeologicalnews:

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Minister of Antiquities Mohamed Ibrahim has explained the context behind a tomb recently rediscovered in Luxor by a Spanish archaeological mission.
The tomb was first discovered in 1904 by Sir Robert Mond, but Mond didn’t describe the tomb’s architectural style or identify its occupant. The tomb was then abandoned and became buried beneath the sands. Egyptologists looked for it subsequently, but their efforts failed.

"It is a very mysterious tomb," asserted Ibrahim, adding that the name of the tomb had changed several times since being mentioned in A Topographical Catalogue of the Private Tombs of Thebes, by Alan Gardiner and Arthur Weigall, published in 1913.

The occupant was first known as “Hatashemro.” Then in the 1950s, he was mentioned as “Seremhatrekhyt.” Later studies revealed that Seremhatrekhyt was a title and not the occupant’s name. Read more.






the starry sky on the himalayas

CLICK ON THE PIC BRO

So amazing

Holy

Def click da pic

the starry sky on the himalayas

CLICK ON THE PIC BRO

So amazing

Holy

Def click da pic

jedavu:

Modern Remakes Of Famous Paintings by The Booooooom + Adobe 

“Smoking Gun” Ancient Coins Are Being Looted from Excavations — and Too Few Coin Scholars Are Firing Back, Baylor Expert Says

archaeologicalnews:

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WACO, Texas — Millions of ancient looted coins from archaeological excavations enter the black market yearly, and a Baylor University researcher who has seen plundered sites likens the thefts to stealing “smoking guns” from crime scenes. But those who collect and study coins have been far too reluctant to condemn the unregulated trade, he says.

“Archaeologists are detectives. When something has been taken away from a historical site, the object is divorced from its relationship with other objects, and its utility for the writing of history — much like solving a criminal case — is diminished,” said Nathan Elkins, Ph.D., assistant art professor in Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences.

Elkins is the staff numismatist at the excavations of an ancient synagogue from the Roman/Byzantine period in Huqoq, Israel. He has written an article, “Investigating the Crime Scene: Looting and Ancient Coins,” that appears in the current issue of Biblical Archaeology Review. Read more.

Archaeologists seek site of Mormon founder’s home

archaeologicalnews:

NAUVOO, Ill. (AP) — An archaeological dig is underway in a tiny western Illinois community for the possible location of a home built for the one-time patriarch of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Searchers for the one-time dwelling of Joseph Smith Sr. and wife Lucy Mack — parents of Joseph Smith, the founder of the Mormon church — have uncovered what appears to be a structural support for the house that research indicates was a double log cabin, the Quincy Herald-Whig reported.

They’ve also found a small house key, along with thousands of bits of pottery, window glass, metal and buttons.

Those discoveries by volunteers over the past three years suggest that the site being sought is just south of the historic Joseph and Emma Smith Mansion House in 1,100-resident Nauvoo (nah-VOO’) in Hancock County. Read more.

sci-universe:

Galileo’s sketches from Sidereus Nuncius (1610), the first published scientific work based on observations made through a telescope

Looted stone of Roman mint reveals stories of prehistoric and medieval civilisations

archaeologicalnews:

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A Roman mint would have produced copper alloy coins on the site of a former villa in Leicester, according to archaeologists investigating pits full of pottery and moulds of valuable metal at the city’s Blackfriars productivity hive.

Enamelled brooches and medieval features at the site have been predated by waste and storage ditches and roundhouses at the settlement, based on the east bank of the River Soar.

Chris Wardle, a planning department archaeologist who has been part of a team responsible for a lengthy examination of the complex industrial terrain, said there was “something special” about the area during the 1st century BC. Read more.

Mitochondrial DNA of first Near Eastern farmers is sequenced for the first time

archaeologicalnews:

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The mitochondrial DNA of the first Near Eastern farmers has been sequenced for the first time. In the research, published in the journal PLOS Genetics, experts analysed samples from three sites located in the birthplace of Neolithic agricultural practices: the Middle Euphrates basin and the oasis of Damascus, located in today’s Syria and date at about 8,000 BC.

The study is focused on the analysis of mitochondrial DNA —a type of non-Mendelian maternally inherited DNA— from the first Neolithic farmers, by means of samples obtained by the UAB research group which were first processed by the UB research group.

Agricultural and husbandry practices originated around 12,000 years ago in a region of the Near East known as the Fertile Crescent. This phenomenon, known as “Neolithic”, meant a profound social, cultural and economic transformation of human populations (agricultural production, sedentary farming lifestyle, origin of the first cities and modern societies, etc.). Read more.

teepublic:

Hero-Glyphics: Hyrule History by Joshln

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