Nerd Stuff
Buried secrets of medieval Leith uncovered

archaeologicalnews:

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Buried secrets of life in medieval Leith have been uncovered after the results of a five-year project to analyse bodies discovered during an archaeological dig were unveiled.

The project, conducted by the city council and Headland Archaeology, began when the remains of almost 400 men, women and children were discovered on the Constitution Street site – previously a section of the South Leith Parish Church’s graveyard – during preparation work for the trams in 2009.

Now forensic artists from the University of Dundee have been able to provide a glimpse of what the Leithers would have looked like 600 years ago by using special technology to rebuild their faces. Read more.

bolo4hagatha:

christian-glibertarian:

ancap-princess:

christian-glibertarian:

g0atman:

Volcano erupting from space

It looks like it’s erupting from Earth.

Earth is in space.

You’re in space.

wow

bolo4hagatha:

christian-glibertarian:

ancap-princess:

christian-glibertarian:

g0atman:

Volcano erupting from space

It looks like it’s erupting from Earth.

Earth is in space.

You’re in space.

wow

Ancient graffiti proves Spain’s Irish links

archaeologicalnews:

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An ancient inscription discovered on a 14th century church in Spain’s Galicia region has been identified as Gaelic; the first written evidence of the northern region’s Irish and Scottish heritage.

For centuries it has gone unnoticed, weathered by Galicia’s incessant drizzle but still visible to those with an eagle-eye.

On one of the granite walls of Santiago church in the small town of Betanzos, a small previously unintelligible inscription five metres above ground kept historians and epigraphists, or people who study ancient inscriptions, baffled for decades.

Researchers working for a private association called the Gaelaico Project now believe they’ve finally deciphered what it reads: “An Ghaltacht” or “Gaelic-speaking area”. Read more.

Radar search to find lost Aboriginal burial site

archaeologicalnews:

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Scientists said Tuesday they hope that radar technology will help them find a century-old Aboriginal burial ground on an Australian island, bringing some closure to the local indigenous population.

Peter Davies, from Queensland’s University of the Sunshine Coast, is researching the ancient shoreline of World Heritage-listed Fraser Island, popular with tourists for its sandy beaches and dingo, or wild dog, population.

He said he was approached by a Fraser Island group earlier this year to help find the graves, believed to be of more than 100 indigenous people, including many children.

"It’s completely sand, and the ground penetrating radar works really well in sand," the soil scientist explained of the island. Read more.

Who Were the Ancient Bog Mummies? Surprising New Clues

archaeologicalnews:

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Cast into northern European wetlands, bog bodies have long appeared as opaque to archaeologists as their dark and watery graves. But new clues are coming in the centuries-old mystery of their origins.

Over 500 Iron Age bog bodies and skeletons dating to between 800 B.C. and A.D. 200 have been discovered in Denmark alone, with more unearthed in Germany, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and Ireland.

Much of the bodies’ skin, hair, clothes, and stomach contents have been remarkably well preserved, thanks to the acidic, oxygen-poor conditions of peat bogs, which are made up of accumulated layers of dead moss. Read more.

Archaeologists say Cherokee remains found at construction site

archaeologicalnews:

GREENVILLE, S.C. —Archaeologists have uncovered what they believe to be a Cherokee Indian burial site, dating back hundreds of years.

The discovery was made in Macon County, North Carolina, at the site of a new recreation park.

Now community leaders are trying to decide how to move forward.

The $2.5 million park project in Franklin has been in the works for more than a year, but plans could be changing.

“We knew the likelihood was high there would be archaeological evidence here. We did not necessarily know there was going to be human remains,” said historic preservationist Tyler Howe. Read more.

Suspected Roman ritual pit found in archaeological dig in Ewell

archaeologicalnews:

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A suspected ritual pit from Roman times, containing a cow’s skull, horse bones and possibly puppy bones, has been uncovered during an archaeological dig.

The exciting discovery was made during a three-week dig in Church Meadow at the site of an important Roman road, Stane Street, in Ewell.

Nearby at the Roman ritual site of Hatch Furlong, archaeologists have previously excavated deep shafts containing the remains of cats and dogs.

Nikki Cowlard, site director of the Church Meadow Project, said that the Romans would not have normally thrown away horse bones. Read more.

17th century ship wreckage travels from A&M campus to Austin

archaeologicalnews:

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The keel and other pieces of wreckage from the 17th century shipwrecked La Belle, were moved successfully Thursday, to the Bullock Texas State History Museum in Austin after a 17-year restoration project by A&M researchers at the Texas A&M Center for Maritime Archaeology and Conservation.

The pieces will be reassembled for an exhibit entitled “La Belle: The Ship That Changed History.”

La Belle arrived beautifully yesterday and we are just very happy about it all,” said Laura Hubbard, marketing director at the Bullock Texas State History Museum. “The museum was in essence built to have this ship, so we are thrilled about seeing all of this come together.” Read more.

mineralists:

Six fossilized Brittlestars preserved in hard Siltstone from the Jurassic period.
Eype, United Kingdom